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“Folklore in Archives” Selection and training workshop for Tata fellows in Folklore

February 20, 2012  Published by

“Folklore in Archives”

Selection and training workshop for Tata fellows in folklore

Manipur University, Chanchipur, Imphal, Manipur.

March 28, 29, and 30, 2012

Day 1: Wednesday, March 28, 2012

10.00am – 11.30am Bearing honorable witness to human creativity – Practices of folklore fieldwork
M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Director, National Folklore Support Centre, Chennai
11.30am – 11.45am Break

11.45am – 01.15pm Methods of collecting field data

Kishore Bhattacharjee, Head, Folklore Research Department, Guwahati University, Assam.

01.15pm – 02.15pm Lunch Break

02.15pm – 03.45pm Documenting folk music (exact topic to be received from Helen Giri)
Helen Giri, Professor, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong.
03.45pm – 04.00pm Break

04.00pm – 05.30pm Styles of ethnographic film making
R.P. Amudhan, Documentary Film Maker, Founder- Marupakkam, Chennai

06.00pm– 08.00pm Screening of documentaries made by the Tata fellows in the previous years:

  1. Thangkhul folk music 31 minutes, Color, 2009, by Rewben Mashangva and Biplab Sing (NFSC-Tata fellow 2008-2009)

Synopsis: The film is about a celebrated folk singer “Rewben Mashangva”, who reveals the endearing nature of folk music. He speaks about the changes that have occurred in folk music learning and the dire predicament faced by the folk musicians in the present scenario. Mashangwa feels that it is participatory music and one doesn’t have to be a great musician to be a folk singer. It flows from within your soul, bringing a sense of community. It is people’s music.

Biplap Singh, a Tata fellow, 2008-2009, collaborated with Rewben Mashangva, a Naga musician, musical instrument maker and performer, to document the musical tradition that Mashangva represents.

  1. Transportation and Occupation of Lisu tribe of Arunachal Pradesh, 30 minutes, color, 2009, by Casanalyrisa Jana (NFSC-Tata fellow (2008-2009)

Synopsis: The Lisu/Yobin area is isolated from the other towns of mainland India due to lack of transport and communication facilities. There is no road communication which connects to mainland India, the only means of transport available is by air provided by the Indian Air Force. The documentary is about the journey by foot, through slippery slopes and rocky terrain, in dense forests of the Namdapha National Park.

The Lisu’s main occupation is agriculture. They grow rice, maize, soya bean, sugarcane and vegetables like mustard, squash, potatoes, pumpkin and cabbages. Rice is the staple food crop of the Lisu. They grow rice by means of terrace farming and wet cultivation.

This documentary was made by Casanalyrisa Jana as part of the research and documentation for Tata fellowships 2008-2009 in Shillong.

  1. Keepers of the Tati, 31 minutes, color 2011, by Oinam Doren (NFSC-Tata fellow 2010-2011)

Synopsis: This documentary was made by Oinam Doren as part of the extensive research and documentation for Tata fellowships 2009-2010 on Folk music of Angami community in context of western / Bollywood music. The documentary focuses ‘Kati” a musical instrument used in the folk music by the Angami community. Oinam Doren along with the community elder M. Meguo-o had beautifully documented the history, making process of the instrument and the story of inheritance.

Day 2: Thursday, March 29, 2012

10.00am – 11.30am Introduction to software used in folklore field work and archiving
M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Director, National Folklore Support Centre, Chennai
11.30am – 11.45am Break

11.45am – 01.15pm Archiving Videos and Audios
M.D. Muthukumaraswamy, Director, National Folklore Support Centre, Chennai.
01.15pm – 02.15pm Lunch Break

02.15pm – 03.45pm Hands-on training:

R.P. Amudhan, Documentary Film Maker, Founder- Marupakkam, Chennai.

03.45pm – 04.00pm Break

04.00pm – 05.30pm Hands-on training:

R.P. Amudhan, Documentary Film Maker, Founder- Marupakkam, Chennai

06.00pm– 08.30pm Screening of documentaries by the R.P. Amudhan

1) In the forest hangs a bridge by Sanjay Kak Documentary / Colour / 39 mins / 1999

Synopsis: In the forest hangs a bridge is a film about the building of a thousand foot suspension bridge by the people of an Adi village, an evocation of the tribal community that makes it possible, and a reflection on the strengths – and fragility – of the idea of community.

Nearly six months of incessant rain in the Siang valley means that the cane and bamboo will eventually rot and fall away, and the bridge needs to be rebuilt every year. With the winter harvest done, the kebang village council sets a date for the bridge construction, and reinforces traditional responsibilities. The cane and bamboo has to be fetched from the communal forests, with labour from the clans. No one will be paid wages, no one is in charge.

2) Naach (The Dance) Director: Saba Dewan, English (subtitled), 84 min, 2008, India

Synopsis: The Sonpur cattle fair in rural Bihar comes alive every evening when more than fifty girls take to the stage and dance for an all male audience. A barbed wire fence separates the performers from the spectators. Originally part of the nautanki, a popular folk theatre genre of north India, the dance of the female performer today has become a replay of Bombay films and music videos that span rural and metropolitan landscape. It is a performance charged with sexual energy. The girls dance, make eye contact, beckon, gesticulate and even abuse a highly responsive all male audience.

What meanings related to contemporary construction and practice of gender, sexuality, labour and popular culture can we read in the dance of the female performer?

3) Do Din Ka Mela (A Two-day Fair) 60 mins, Kutchi and Gujarati with English subtitles, 2009
Directed by Anjali Monteiro and KP Jayasankar

“Nothing in the world will last – it is but a two day fair” sings Mura Lala Fafal, drawing inspiration from the Sufi traditions of Sant Kabir and Abdul Lateef Bhita’i. He is accompanied on the Jodiya Pava (double flute) by his nephew Kanji Rana Sanjot. Kanji taught himself to play and make his own flutes after hearing the music on the radio. Mura and Kanji are Meghwals, a pastoral Dalit community that lives on the edge of the Great Rann of Kutch, in the Western Indian state of Gujarat. They are both daily wage labourers and subsistence farmers in an arid zone. The film is a two day journey into the music and everyday life of this uncle-nephew duo, set against the backdrop of the Rann. The music and culture of the region is a rich tapestry of many traditions and faiths, an affirmation of the syncretic wisdom of the marginalised communities that live in this spectacular and yet fragile area.

Day 3: Friday, March 30, 2012

10.00am – 01.15pm Interview/ Selection of research fellows

01.15pm – 02.15pm Lunch Break

02.15pm – 05.30pm Concluding session

06.00pm – 08.00pm Folk performances of Manipur

***********************

Selection Committee

  1. Niyati Mehta

Program Officer Media, Art and Culture, Sir Dorabji Tata Trust and the Allied Trusts, Mumbai.

  1. Helen Giri

Professor, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong

  1. Kishore Bhattacharjee

Head, Folklore Research Department-Guwahati University, Guwahati,  Assam

  1. M.D. Muthukumaraswamy

Director, National Folklore Support Centre, Chennai

  1. Nongthombom Premchand (Host Professor)

Director, Educational Multimedia Research Centre, Manipur University, Chanchipur, Imphal, Manipur

 

 

 

Schedule prepared by Vinodh Premdhas, Program Officer, Communication and Coordination, NFSC, Chennai

This is a tentative schedule